April is National Poetry Month

In honor of National Poetry Month, we are featuring the poem Logology from a special guest poet, A.J. Wagoner.  Please visit his blog ajwagoner.com (Cleaver of God).  A few months ago, A.J. shared Poetry in the Brew with his readers for a “Thursday’s Treasure” feature.

Logology

Logology:

To study words,

Words about words

And play in epic fashions

With manipulations ploys.

Eight categories arise:

Onomastics take Nomenclature

To new heights

Through proper names, Nicknames

Eponyms, Toponyms, Pseudonyms

All to tell you of Master Filly Swim.

Expressions excite exploration–

Idioms to Proverbs

Solomon’s Slang shows up

Master of Catchphrases

Just to sally forth a new Slogan.

Three-way to Figures of Speech,

Like a Metaphor, share a Simile,

Hyperbole’s conformity

For Euphemism’s industrial action

Within random order of us all–

The Oxymora morals.

Word play of Associations–

Synonyms, so similar,

Antonyms, never familiar,

Homographs, Homophones

To Subordinate-Subordinates Order.

Five guys deep, Word Formations,

Affixes before and after

For Compound’s Acronyms

Mnemonic ploys Portmanteau’s telethon

With newness of Neologisms

And an Initial’s F.U.N.

Oh, Logology, yes!

On to Anagrams

Where Same Woe

Fails to ‘name not one man’

Of Palindrome Lore.

How the Word Games persist!

Scrabble to Words with Friends

Language fun all around–

Add some flair Alliteration

Rhymes Riddles to fiddles

For Tongue Twisters ties Swatch watch.

A little to the end

Final Word Play, Ambiguities

Leaden with riffs and cuffs

To roil the feathers

Upon all Double-Entendre.

Yes, Logology widens the scope

To see the Linguist’s cache

Of certain Argot and Jargon

Just to Punt you to more

And share an avid Elvish,

“Mellon” unto you.

~By: A.J. Wagoner

April 13, 2013

Poetry in the Brew 

Portland Brew East

1921 Eastland

Nashville, TN  37206

Open Mic Sign-Up:  5:30

Reading Starts:  6:00

If you need inspiration to write, the theme is JOY.

Special Guest Host: James C. Floyd

Special Guest Feature:  Denise Satterfield Wilson

Described as a “prolific writer,” Denise Satterfield Wilson developed a love for words during early childhood. Correct grammar was highly stressed by her aunt Thelma, an English teacher.

On Dec.1, 1986, a tragic incident, in which her 17 year-old son witnessed his best friend’s murder, caused Denise to take pen in hand in an effort to express the roller coaster of emotions she felt inside.

Denise has shared her written works for over fifteen years at the Southern Festival of Books as well as several Nashville poetry venues: Windows on the Cumberland, The Abbyss, Douglas Corner, where her path crossed that of Tennessee’s Poet Laureate, Maggi Britton Vaughn, 12th and Porter, The Pub of Love and Bean Central.

Ms Wilson has also shared her poetry at Pearl-Cohen School, Hunter’s Lane and Cohen Adult Learning Center.

In 1994 Ms. Wilson tied for Third Place in the Tennessee Writer Alliance’s Poetry Competition, which was judged by world-renown poet Nikki Giovanni.

Denise was formerly a member of a trio of poets called “Dark Voices,” which also included poets Aissatou E. Sunjata and James C. Floyd, aka “The Jefferson Street Poet.”

Worst Enemy

This is a poem for my son, Robert

Whom I’ve spent a lifetime trying to protect

From scary monsters that crept into his dreams at night,

Those who made him follower instead of leader by day.

The one whose 5 steel bullets

Shattered his innocence at 17

And stole his best friend’s life away.

This is a poem for my son, Robert

Who, at 26, is surrounded by cold, steel bars

That keep me out/ him in

With an enemy I can NEVER protect him from…

HIMSELF.

© 1996 Denise Satterfield Wilson

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